Geoffrey K. Pullum: Invited Public Lectures and Colloquia, 1972 - 2000


1972

Department of Language, University of York, November 1972: From formal to substantive phonology: the demise of the `Meccano Set' proposal.

1973

Department of Linguistics and Contemporary English Language, University of Lancaster (England); May 1973: The relevance and irrelevance of linguistics to second language teaching.

1974

Department of Phonetics and Linguistics, University College London (England); February 1974: `Stupidity', `blinkering', and related concepts in the theory of grammar.

Department of Language, University of York (England); May 1974:
(1) Three topics in Spanish phonology.
(2) Universal grammar and natural history.

1975

Department of Language and Linguistics, University of Essex (England); March 1975: Syntax and phonology: when an NP is there and when it isn't.

Department of Language, University of York (England); May 1975: Black holes in syntax.

Department of Linguistics, University of Birmingham (England); October 1975: Word order universals and grammatical relations.

1977

Institute for General Linguistics, University of Salzburg (Austria); May 1977:
(1) Word order universals: some new evidence;
(2) The `trace theory of movement rules': a critique;
(3) Implications of the analysis of auxiliaries;
(4) How wh-movement rules work.

Department of Language, University of York (England); November 1977: When semantics isn't semantics: the appeal to interpretive rules.

Department of Language and Linguistics, University of Essex (England); November 1977: Relational syntax and the nonexistence of semantic anomaly.

Cognitive Studies Program, School of Social Sciences, University of Sussex (England); December 1977: Anomaly, anaphora, and the paradoxes of self-reference.

1978

Department of Language and Linguistics, University of Essex (England); April 1978: Universal determination of syllable division.

Summer Institute of Linguistics, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks; August 1978:
(1) Grammatical relations and constituent order.
(2) On the motivated chomage law.
(3) What the theoreticians would do for the field linguists if they could.
(4) What the field linguists should do for the theoreticians if they can.

Summer Institute of Linguistics, Buckinghamshire (England); September 1978: Grammatical relations. Department of Linguistics, University of Washington; December 1978:
(1) Universal determination of syllable division.
(2) Trace theory: the theory that never was.

1979

Department of Language and Linguistics, University of Essex (England); November 1979: There is no `AUX': not in Luiseño, not in English.

1980

Department of Language, University of York (England); January 1980: Respectively, incorporation, and comparatives: three famous arguments against context-free phrase structure grammar. (Joint presentation with Gerald Gazdar.)

Department of Linguistics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, August 1980: The phrase structure backlash.

1981

Board of Studies in Linguistics, University of California, Santa Cruz, California; January 1981: Object initial languages and their theoretical implications.

Department of Linguistics, UCLA, Los Angeles, California; January 1981: On constituent-command.

Department of Lingistics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); February 1981: Some properties of natural languages that follow from the theory of phrase structure.

Department of Linguistics, University of California, San Diego, California; May 1981: The context-freeness of human languages.

Department of Linguistics, University of California, Berkeley, California; May 1981: Language, libel, and the linguist.

Department of Linguistics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; June 1981: Generalized phrase structure grammar. (A course of six presentations given jointly with Gerald Gazdar and Ivan A. Sag.)

Department of Linguistics, Stanford University, California; November 1981: Word order typology and phrase structure rules.

1982

Experimental Psychology Program, University of California, Santa Cruz, California; February 1982: The return of phrase structure grammar: implications for psychology.

University of California, Berkeley, California; November 1982: Generative capacity rides again: implications of mathematical results for linguistics.

1983

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois; University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); September 1983: Eliminating phrase structure rules?

University of California, Santa Barbara, California; November 1983: Capturing constituent order generalizations in GPSG.

1984

Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana; January 1984: Apology for the Synopsis: GPSG made clearer (and better).

Information-technology Promotion Agency, Tokyo (Japan); December 1984: Three lectures on generalized phrase structure grammar.

Sophia University, Tokyo (Japan); December 1984: GPSG as a framework for executing GB ideas.

Institute for New Generation Computer Technology (ICOT), Tokyo (Japan), December 1984: Natural language processing with a generalized phrase structure grammar: the HPSG system.

1985

Center for the Study of Language and Information, Stanford University, California; February 1985: Generalized phrase structure grammar for nonlinguists. University of Colorado, Boulder; March 1985:
(1) Grammar, computation, and cognition: some wider implications of generalized phrase structure grammar.
(2) Phrase structure grammar with no phrase structure rules. IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York; March 1985: Generalized phrase structure grammar and natural language processing.

Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; March 1985: Generalized phrase structure grammar: five lectures.

University of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); October 1985: Human and non-human languages.

1986

University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii; March 1986: Why linguistic theory is not a theory of the human capacity for language.

UCLA, Los Angeles, California; April 1986: The non-biological basis of linguistic theory.

1987

University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon; August 1987: Five lectures on applications of linguistic theory to the syntax of Amazonian languages.

Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; October 1987: Category structures, feature cooccurrence, and the computational utility of various types of phrase structure grammar.

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, and Cornell Linguistic Circle, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; October 1987: Obligatorily extraposed irrealis clauses: an undocumented construction in English, and its theoretical implications.

Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; October 1987: Endocentricity and the nominal gerund.

Center for the Study of Language and Information, Stanford University, California; October 1987: UNIX for linguists.

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky; December 1987: Human and non-human languages.

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois; December 1987: Dummies and movers in subcategorized positions.

1988

Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); May 1988: Linguistics as a cognitive science: four roadblocks. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); May 1988: Dummy objects and the return of Raising.

The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; October 1988:
(1) Alternatives to a biologistic foundation for linguistic theory;
(2) Heterocategorial heads and the English nominal gerund construction.

University of California, Davis, California; November 1988: Why linguistic theory is not biologically based.

1989

University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado; February 1989: Its that don't mean it, ifs that don't mean if.

Max Planck Institut für Psycholinguistik, Nijmegen, Holland; August 1989: Biology, bureaucracy, and bar level.

Rice University, Houston, Texas; October 1989: Capturing generalizations about phrase structure.

California State University, Fresno; February 1989:
(1) English as the "official language" of the United States: a linguistic and political critique.
(2) Universal and parochial generalizations about phrase structure.

Syntax and Semantics Seminar, Department of Linguistics, University of California, Los Angeles; February 1989: Noun phrases, gerunds, and extraposition.

1990

Summer Institute of Linguistics, International Linguistic Center, Dallas, Texas; April 1990: Capturing generalizations about phrase structure.

Syntax Workshop, Stanford University, Stanford, California; November 1990: The quasi-serial verb construction GO GET in modern English.

1991

E"o.."tv"o.."s Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary, July 1991: The Principle of Phonology-Free Syntax.

Linguistics Program, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; November 1991: Verb sequences in English and how to inflect them: implications for linguistic theory.

Department of Philosophy, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio; November 1991: Cognition, innateness, language, and race.

1992

Temple Beth-El Synagogue, Soquel, California; March 1992: Eskimos, immigrants, and engineers: attitudes toward strangers in California society.

Student Linguistic Association, the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; April 1992: The lighter side of being a linguist. University of Pittsburgh, October 1992;

University of California, Santa Cruz, November 1992: Languages, minds, and abstract objects: platonism versus realism in the philosophy of linguistics.

1993

Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, November 1993:
(1) Alien tongues: How strange could a language be?
(2) The case of the nominal gerund.

1994

New York University, New York, NY, November 1994: Evaluative applications of linguistics.

1995

Institute for Research in Cognitive Science and Department of Linguistics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, May 1995: Lexical and syntactic properties that keep the parsing problem tractable.

Institute for Cognitive Science, University of Southampton, England, May 1995: Eskimo words for snow: What are the actual facts? And what implications could they have for the psychology of human categorization?

School of Cognitive and Computing Sciences, University of Sussex, England, June 1995: Five reasons for not believing the computational complexity arguments about the difficulty of parsing human languages.

1996

McPherson Center for Art and History, Santa Cruz, California, March 1996: Language, world view, and reality: how many words do Eskimos really have for snow, and what implications could that possibly have?

Cabrillo College, Aptos, California, May 1996: Making English as the official language of the United States: the linguistics and the politics, the stupidity and the danger.

Department of English, University of Queensland, Australia, July 1996: English as the `official language' of the United States: a linguistic and political critique.

Department of Philosophy, University of Queensland, Australia, July 1996: The ontology of linguistic theories: languages, minds, and abstract objects.

Center for Language Teaching Research, University of Queensland, Australia, July 1996: Strong and weak forms of function words in English: the solution to the riddle of their distribution.

Department of English, University of Queensland, Australia, August 1996: The many truths of the many Eskimo words for snow: a look at the actual facts and their implications.

Department of Linguistics, The Australian National University, July 1996: The therapy verbs: the morpholexical nature of to-contraction.

1998

California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, May 1998: The language instinct issue and the so-called `logical problem of language acquisition'.

Linguistics Research Seminar, Department of English, University of Queensland, Australia, and School of Languages and Linguistics, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia, August 1998: Fear and loathing in Oakland: the linguistics and politics of "Ebonics".

2000

Chicago Linguistic Society Monthly Meeting, February 17, 2000, and Department of Linguistics colloquium, The Ohio State University, February 18, 2000: Frameworks and languages. [With Barbara C. Scholz; presented jointly.]

Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, Netherlands, June 2000: Partial ungrammaticality, lexical novelties, and learnability. [With Barbara C. Scholz; presented by Pullum.]

2001

CogLunch, Stanford University, Stanford CA, October 2001: The Big-Bag-o'-Words view of language, and some related errors.

2002

Department of Linguistics Colloquium, University of California, Santa Cruz, January 2002: Generative grammar, gradient ungrammaticality, and model-theoretic syntax [With Barbara C. Scholz; presented jointly.]

Colloquium on Linguistic Nativism and the Poverty of the Stimulus, Department of Linguistics, Stanford University, Stanford CA, January 2002: Supporting linguistic nativism: arguments from stimulus poverty. [With Barbara C. Scholz; presented by Pullum.]

Rovira i Virgili University, Tarragona, and Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, Spain, November 2002: Recasting English grammar: Why the tradition needed revision.

University of Essex, England, December 2002: Theoretical linguistics and practical concerns: reflections on the divorce.

University of Sussex, England, December 2002: Recasting the grammar of English: why the tradition needed revision.

University of Manchester and University College London, England, December 2002: Marginal members of lexical categories and their theoretical implications.

2003

Stanford University, February 2003: On the thesis that human languages are infinite. Presentation (of joint work with Barbara Scholz) in the Logical Methods in the Humanities series.

Symbolic Systems Colloquium, Stanford University, April 2003: Eskimo snow vocabulary: the rest of the story.

Annual Linguistics Symposium, California State University, Fullerton, April 25, 2003: Knowledge of language; ignorance of grammar.

Department of Linguistics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, May 2003: Orwell's other problem: on how little we know of grammar.

Department of Linguistics, University of California, Santa Barbara, May 2003: Problems of lexical categorization in traditional grammar and theoretical linguistics.

15th European Summer School in Logic, Language and Information (ESSLLI), Technical University of Vienna, Austria, August 2003: Foundations of model-theoretic syntax: Linguistic aspects. One-week lecture course presented jointly with Barbara C. Scholz.

Institute for Research on Cognitive Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, September 2003: The model-theoretic perspective on syntax: three significant consequences

Penn Speaker Series, Department of Linguistics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, September 2003: English grammar: the curious case of the missing twentieth century.

Artificial Intelligence Research Group, Aiken Laboratory, Harvard University, October 2003: The model-theoretic perspective on natural language syntax: some unexpectedly radical consequences. (Joint presentation with Barbara C. Scholz.)

Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz, November 2003: Developing an empirical argument for linguistic nativism: Some constructive suggestions.

2004

Center for Human Development, University of California, San Diego, January 2004: Arguments from stimulus poverty. (Joint presentation with Barbara C. Scholz.)

Department of Linguistics, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, May 2004: What happened to English grammar?

Invited lecture at the 3rd North American Summer School in Logic, Language and Information, UCLA, June 2004: What grammars say.

2005

Invited lecture at the Institute for Research in Cognitive Science, University of Pennsylvania, October 2005: Monkey syntax.

2006

Invited lecture at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, February 2006: Heedless of grammar.

Invited lecture at University College London, September 2006: Render unto syntax the things which are syntax.

Invited lecture at the Université de Paris 7 (Paris, France), September 2006: The making of The Cambridge Grammar.

Invited lecture at the Université de Lille 3 (Lille, France), September 2006: Lexical categorization: syntax and semantics.

2007

Robert Efron Lecture at Pomona College (Pomona, California), April 2007: Modeling Human and Non-Human Languages.

Course of five lectures at ESSLLI 2007, the 19th European Summer School on Logic, Language and Information, at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, August 13-17: Syntax for Computational Linguists.

Visiting lecture at the Department of Language and Linguistic Science, University of York, October 2007: Interdisciplinary Work on Linguistic Nativism: Investigating Stimulus Poverty. (Joint presentation with Barbara C. Scholz.)

2008

Linguistics and English Language Seminar Series at the University of Manchester, April 2008: Infinity, recursion, and the universal properties of human language. (Presenting joint work with Barbara C. Scholz.)

2009

Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, Netherlands, January 2009: What is this thing called systematicity? (Presenting joint work with Barbara C. Scholz.)

Hong Kong Baptist University, 2 March 2009 (2 p.m.): English grammar: The lost twentieth century.

Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 2 March 2009 (5 p.m.): Language studies: Bridging science and humanities.

Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 3 March 2009: Grammaticality, frequency, and evidence in syntax.

North East Syntax Seminar, Newcastle University, 1 May 2009: Model-theoretic syntax and the implausibility of movement.

Invited presentation at the Annual General Meeting of the Philological Society, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, 8 May 2009: The part-of-speech classifications in English dictionaries: Critiques, criteria, and proposals.

Linguistic Society of America Linguistic Institute, University of California, Berkeley, July 2009: English Grammar (a course of six lectures).

Language Teaching Forum, Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh, November 2009: Adjectives and demons: Teaching grammar, teaching style, and the writing of Dan Brown.

Syntax and Semantics Research Group, University of Edinburgh, October 2009: Why do people believe the DP hypothesis?

York St. John University, October 2009: Adjectives and demons: Grammar, style, and Dan Brown's writing.

University of Essex, December 2009:
(1) Model-theoretic syntax and the implausibility of movement.
(2) The discipline where time stood still: Stagnation in the study of English grammar.

2010

Brown University, Providence, RI, April 2010:
(1) Arguing for linguistic nativism: Concepts, claims, and criteria (with Barbara C. Scholz; presented jointly).
(2) The land of the free and The Elements of Style.

Boston College, Boston, MA, April 2010: The land of the free and The Elements of Style.

MIT, Cambridge, MA, April 2010: The land of the free and The Elements of Style: How False Claims about English Grammar Do Actual Harm.

University of Oxford, October 2010: Building an interdisciplinary case for linguistic nativism: The controversy over one-anaphora and phrase structure. (Presenting joint work with Barbara C. Scholz.)

2011

Northumbria University, May 2011: Passive acceptance: The grammar and politics of voice First Linguistics Annual Lecture.

University of Salford, October 2011: Don't be passive: The linguistics and politics of the maligned passive voice. Linguistics Master Class series.

2012

University of Cambridge, 18 June 2012: Model-theoretic syntax and the unpersuasiveness of movement analyses.

A. K. Smith Visiting Scholar series lecture at Trinity College, Hartford CT, 17 October 2012: Grammar bullies: What's wrong with them and how to deal with them.

Expressive Communication and Origins of Meaning Research Group (ECOM) at the Department of Philosophy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 26 October 2012: The grammar and meaning of anaphoric "one": multidisciplinary implications.

University of South Carolina, Columbia SC, 9 November 2012: (1) Nervous cluelessness: How grammar teaching in America damages people's confidence and makes their writing worse; (2) The grammar and politics of the passive voice.

Yale University, New Haven CT, 12 November 2012: Multidisciplinary implications of anaphoric "one".

2013

University of Washington, Seattle WA, 12 February 2013: Jessie and John Danz Visiting Lecture: The scandal of English grammar teaching: Ignorance of grammar, damage to writing skills, and what we can do about it.

2014

Department of Linguistics, University of California, Berkeley, 21 April 2014: The lexicography of insult and the philosophy of slurs.

Department of Linguistics, Stanford University, 24 April 2014: The stimulus poverty story: misconduct or incompetence?.

Vienna Linguistic Circle, 25 November 2014: The right way to describe syntactic structure.

Department of English, University of Vienna, 26 November 2014: English grammar as a domain of scientific exploration.

2015

Department of English, University of Delaware, March 19, 2015: Heedless of Grammar: How English grammatical education collapsed in the 20th century, and what might be done about it.

Princeton University, March 23, 2015: Linguistic Science and English Grammar.

University of Kiel, Germany, April 24, 2015: Passivophobia and Ignorance of Syntax.

Politics and International Relations Society, University of Durham, October 15, 2015: Linguistics and Politics: Interactions and Cautions.

2016

General Linguistics Seminar, University of Oxford, May 2, 2016: The 20th-century obsession with condemning passive clauses as evil.

IGRA group, University of Leipzig, June 22, 2016: Formalizing syntactic theories model-theoretically.

2017

University of Lille 3, 5 April 2017: Emil Post, computably enumerable sets, and the description of human languages.

University of Kiel, 18 May 2017: Usage advisors and avoidance of passives: the unqualified in full pursuit of the unidentified.

2018

University of Texas, February 2018: (1) The Linguistics and Philosophy of Language Acquisition; (2) Formalizing syntactic theories via model theory.

British Academy Summer Showcase 2018: Linguistics and why you should study it.

The 2018 Hermann Paul Lecture, University of Freiburg, Germany, 26 November 2018: Why linguistics matters.

2019

Linguistics Program, Columbia University, New York, 22 February 2019: Grammar, writing style, and linguistics.

Discourse in Philosophy colloquium, Institute for Logic, Language and Computation, University of Amsterdam, 14 March 2019: Formalization and prediction in theoretical syntax.

Amsterdam Colloquium for Language and Communication, University of Amsterdam, 15 March 2019: Syntactic theory from a model-theoretic perspective.

Vossius Centre for the History of Humanities and Science, University of Amsterdam, 18 March 2019: New light on the prehistory of generative grammar.

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File last revised: Wed Feb 13 17:59:56 GMT 2019